TEMPERAMENTS EXPLAINED

Temperaments

The sanguine temperament
It is characterized by moderate plumpness of person and firmness of flesh. The hair is red or bright chestnut, the eyes blue, the complexion fair and florid, and the skin soft and thin. The blood-vessels are large, the circulation active, and the pulse full and frequent. The countenance is animated, the movements quick, the passions excitable, the mind volatile and unsteady.

The phlegmatic temperament
Distinguished by roundness of form, softness of the muscles, and repletion of the cellular tissue. The hair is fair, the eyes light blue or gray, the skin pale, and the lips fleshy. The blood- vessels are small, the circulation languid, and the pulse slow. It takes a great deal to arouse one of this tempera- ment.

The bilious temperament
It is recognized by moderate plumpness and much firmness of flesh, with harshly expressed outlines of person, and decided expression of countenance. The hair is black, the eyes and the complexion dark. The pulse is full, firm, and of moderate frequency. There is much energy of character, with great power of endurance and permanence of impression, physical and mental.

The nervous temperament
Distinguished by a small, spare form, delicate features, with thin upper lip, slender muscles, quick movements, pallor of countenance, and feeble health. The pulse is feeble, and quick, and easily excited by mental emotions or nervous impressions. The whole nervous system, including the brain, is active, the senses are acute, the thoughts quick, and the imagination lively. 5th. The melancholic temperament is nearly allied to the bilious, and is marked by peculiar calmness and seriousness of mind, with a great tenacity of impressions, and a tendency to indulge in gloomy thoughts.

It is rare that we meet with pure specimens of these temperaments. They are often so combined that it is difficult to say which predominates.

GEORGE W. COOK, M. D.