It causes a fever which is remitting or intermitting in its type. You will find it a valuable remedy in the remitting types of fever in children. During the febrile exacerbation they are very nervous and restless, tossing about continually. (You must not give Aconite in these cases, unless
the mental symptoms of that remedy are present.) The face has the suffused redness, and there is drowsiness. When aroused from this drowsy state the child is peevish, irritable, nervous, even somewhat excitable, but there is never the violent tossing about of Aconite. In extreme cases the drowsiness may give place to convulsive motion. The muscles of the face twitch; the child becomes rigid, as though it were about to have a convulsion. There is usually not very much thirst, but there is great prostration, so that the child seems too weak to move. Every part of the body seems to be so sore that he cries out if you move him. These symptoms will remit and, possibly, the next morning, slight perspiration will show itself. The next afternoon the symptoms return as before.

In intermittent types of fever you may select Gelsemium in the beginning. The chill runs up the back or starts from the feet and extends upward. It is sometimes associated with copious urination and with bruised aching all over the body. The patient wants to be held so that he will not shake so much. Then comes the fever with the symptoms that I have already mentioned. Sometimes irritability is exhibited. He can neither bear noise nor light. The sweat is slight or partial, but it relieves all the pains. The tongue is coated white or yellow. Speech is thick. The bowels are constipated and the stools are yellow. It is especially indicated in intermittent fever of nonmalarial origin.

Reference: The Clinical Materia Medica:

  • Gabriela Rivera


  • Rose Humphreys

    and also for the feeling of “icy coldness” running thru your body… many times the prodrome of flu symptoms.

  • Sunita Agarwal

    Hum kya medicine le

  • Sunita Agarwal

    Hello Bhabi ji