DANA ULLMAN

My father is a medical doctor, a pediatrician and an allergist. It is a tad ironic and even cosmic that he was an allergist because the specialty of allergy typically uses small doses of an allergen to reduce a person’s hypersensitivity. Even one of the three physicians to start the American Academy of Allergy was a homeopathic physician.

In 1971, I was an undergraduate student at the University of California at Berkeley when I began to study various natural healing methods, including nutrition, herbology, Chinese medicine, body therapies, and homeopathy. Although I had read a book on homeopathy by George Vithoulkas and several articles on the subject, it wasn’t until I joined a group of people who begun to study it together that I began to take it seriously.
I was intrigued by homeopathy because it was so highly systematic and because the determination for the use of each medicine was based on real research (experiments in toxicology called “provings”). I was also smitten by homeopathy’s worldwide history, not only because it was once so popular throughout the world but because it is still popular. It was particularly intrigued by the politics and economics that surround it and that explain for why homeopathy was attacked by conventional medical associations and Big Pharma companies.

Bill Gray, MD, and Randall Neustaedter had both studied homeopathy previously for a year and wanted to create a group of health professionals who would focus on the study of homeopathic medicine. This group included 3 MDs, 2 RNs, a dentist, a midwife, a couple yoga teachers, and several students, including myself at the time. We called this group the “Bay Area Homeopathic Study Group,” and we met weekly for five years.
Many of America’s leading homeopaths came from this group of people, including Bill Gray, MD, Roger Morrison, MD, Dr. Nancy Herrick, FNP, Louis Klein, RSHom, Randall Neustaedter, OMD, David Warkentin, PA (the founder of MacRepertory, now called Synergy), and myself.

Every fellow homeopath and every patient have had major impacts upon me and my practice.

May a thousand flowers bloom:
May homeopathy be realized to be “the original nanomedicine,” and therefore, be on the cutting edge of medical science and pharmacology today.
May homeopathy be used in every hospital in the world.
May physicians realize that they do not need to become homeopaths to learn to use some simple homeopathic medicines.
May physicians learn that the Hippocratic tradition of respecting the dictum, “First, do no harm,” means that physician should integrate homeopathy into their daily practice.
May citizens learn to use homeopathy for acute self-limiting ailments.
May homeopaths have the humility to realize that there are many ways to use homeopathic medicines and that is there is not just “one way” to make it work in healing.

DANA ULLMAN, MPH, CCH, is one of America’s leading advocates for homeopathy. He has authored 10 books, including The Homeopathic Revolution: Why Famous People and Cultural Heroes Choose Homeopathy, Homeopathy A-Z, Homeopathic Medicines for Children and Infants, Discovering Homeopathy, and (the best-selling) Everybody’s Guide to Homeopathic Medicines (with Stephen Cummings, MD). Dana also authored an ebook that is a continually growing resource to 200+ clinical studies published in peer-review medical journals testing homeopathic medicines. This ebook combines the descriptions of these studies with practical clinical information on how to use homeopathic medicines for 100+ common ailments. This ebook is entitled Evidence Based Homeopathic Family Medicine, and it is an invaluable resource. Dana has been certified in classical homeopathy by the leading organization in the U.S. for professional homeopaths.
He is the founder of Homeopathic Educational Services, America’s leading resource center for homeopathic books, tapes, medicines, software, and correspondence courses. Homeopathic Educational Services has co-published over 35 books on homeopathy with North Atlantic Books.
Dana writes a regular column for the wildly popular website Huffington post.